German Poker Pro Fedor Kruse Implicated In Solver Cheating Scandal

Fedor KruseYet another cheating scandal has erupted within the global poker community.

This time, the accusations point to German poker pro Fedor Kruse, who allegedly used a real time solver while playing cash games. The use of such software is prohibited at online poker sites.

The scandal initially came to light when Kruse’s roommates exposed him on Two Plus Two forum. The whistleblowers alleged that the German poker pro was playing using two computers. One computer was used to play poker, while the other was used to open an RTA software which stored pre-solved hands. The former Call of Duty streamer allegedly a different keyboard and mouse to trick poker room security.

While playing, Kruse would consult the solver which helped him to make GTO decisions. The whistleblowers backed up their claims by posting a photo of Kruse’s two-computer set up, and sharing a number of screenshots of their conversations with the poker pro. In one of those conversations, Kruse referred to the solver as the “dream machine”, and appeared to recommend it to one of his roommates to avoid being beaten by the regulars.

Rapid Climb

Kruse managed to build a successful career out of being a Call of Duty streamer with over 400,000 subscribers. He made a shift to poker around 2015 playing mostly tournaments.

He began playing $100NL cash games just about a year ago and then climbed to $200NL. At this level, players within the German poker community who knew Kruse would consider him an average player, but he quickly rocketed up, playing as high as $200/$400 on online poker platforms. This was where suspicions began of Kruse using a real-time solver during his plays.

Other players also noted that he would consistently play 100 big blinds deep, using bet sizings similar to those programmed in solvers. Some of Kruse’s roommates admitted to getting a piece of his action, and they acknowledged their mistake. One of them shared a screenshot of Kruse’s cash game results while the staking deal was in play.

Kruse began in the $5,000 buy-in level, and while he initially lost, he managed to pull off a huge comeback by amassing $92,408 in winnings. He then rapidly moved to the $10,000 buy-in games. The German pro also took part in a number of events during the World Series of Poker (WSOP) Online Bracelet Series on GGPoker and even made a final table finish in one of them. He also finished runner-up in an online Circuit ring event where he won $92,000.

As of this writing, Kruse has yet to respond to the allegations against him. His roommates said they’ve already reported their suspicions to GGPoker and PokerStars.

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