Customer Takes Betfred to High Court After Being Denied £1.7m Prize

Unpaid win

A Betfred customer has taken the operator to High Court after being denied a £1.7m ($2.2m) prize. Andrew Green hit the jackpot on the “Frankie Dettori’s Magic Seven Blackjackonline game, only to be told later by Betfred that the win was the result of a software glitch and the prize would not be paid.

a judge could decide in Green’s favor or send the case to trial.

Green has battled for over two years to get Betfred pay up, having originally achieved the incredible windfall in early 2018. The case heads to High Court next week, where a judge could decide in Green’s favor or send the case to trial.

Evidence yet to be presented

After winning such life-changing money, Green said celebrated for five days straight. During that time, Betfred representatives even congratulated him before reversing course, claiming that a software malfunction caused the jackpot to be triggered. Per the site’s terms and conditions, this is a justifiable reason to void the jackpot.

Green claims that Betfred has never provided any evidence to prove that a software issue was at fault. In fact, in a November 2018 court hearing to get the company to reveal its evidence, Betfred said that it was Playtech, the software developer, that held that information. Playtech supposedly would not share it for confidentiality reasons.

If there was a glitch, that’s between Betfred and the software provider.”

“They have no reason not to pay me, in my opinion,” Green said. “If there was a glitch, that’s between Betfred and the software provider.”

Green went on to say that Betfred led him to think that he was a winner. He added that the operator even advised him to open several bank accounts in order to spread out his winnings.

Getting the run-around

Green and his lawyer say Betfred offered £60,000 ($77,631) as a settlement – on the condition he sign a non-disclosure agreement – as well as £2,500 ($3,235) to reimburse his celebratory expenses. He turned that deal down, calling it an insult. According to Green, the entire ordeal has caused him a great amount stress and anxiety.

“The last two and a half years have felt like hell on earth,” Green’s attorney Peter Coyle told Gambling Insider.

There’s been times when I wished I had not even won the money.”

“It’s been horrendous. There’s been times when I wished I had not even won the money,” Green added, speaking with LincolnshireLive.

Green’s legal team has stated that if Betfred loses the High Court case, it would be a groundbreaking ruling, as it would be the first time a site’s terms and conditions were “subject to judicial scrutiny.”

If the ruling goes in Green’s favor, Betfred will pay him over £2m ($2.6m), which includes the prize money, interest, and legal expenses.

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